Month: August 2018

Geologists uncover new clues about largest Mass Extinction ever

A new study could help explain the driving force behind the largest mass extinction in the history of earth, known as the End-Permian Extinction. The event, also known as the Great Dying, occurred around 250 million years ago when a massive volcanic eruption in what is today the Russian province of Siberia sent nearly 90 …

Geologists uncover new clues about largest Mass Extinction ever Read More »

A timescale for the origin and evolution of all of life on Earth

A new study led by scientists from the University of Bristol has used a combination of genomic and fossil data to explain the history of life on Earth, from its origin to the present day. Palaeontologists have long sought to understand ancient life and the shared evolutionary history of life as a whole. However, the …

A timescale for the origin and evolution of all of life on Earth Read More »

Old Species Learn New Tricks Very Slowly

A quick look at the fossil record shows that no species lasts forever. On average, most species exist for around a million years, although some species persist for much longer. A new study published in Scientific Reports from paleontologists at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama shows that young species can take advantage of new opportunities …

Old Species Learn New Tricks Very Slowly Read More »

Diving Robots find that Antarctic seas release surprising amounts of Carbon Dioxide in Winter

The Southern Ocean surrounding Antarctica is regarded by scientists as a large and crucial absorber of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. New findings from autonomous floats deployed in the Southern Ocean, however, provide the first comprehensive data to suggest that, in winter, the open water nearest the sea ice surrounding Antarctica releases significantly more carbon …

Diving Robots find that Antarctic seas release surprising amounts of Carbon Dioxide in Winter Read More »

Corals and Algae go back further than previously thought, all the way to Jurassic Period

Algae and corals have been leaning on each other since dinosaurs roamed the earth, much longer than had been previously thought, according to new research led by scientists at Oregon State University and Penn State. The findings, published today in Current Biology, are a key advance toward a better understanding of coral reefs, the Earth’s …

Corals and Algae go back further than previously thought, all the way to Jurassic Period Read More »

Oldest-ever Igneous Meteorite Contains Clues to Planet Building Blocks

Scientists believe the solar system was formed some 4.6 billion years ago when a cloud of gas and dust collapsed under gravity, possibly triggered by a cataclysmic explosion from a nearby massive star or supernova. As this cloud collapsed, it formed a spinning disk with the sun in the center. Piece by piece, scientists have …

Oldest-ever Igneous Meteorite Contains Clues to Planet Building Blocks Read More »

Yosemite granite “tells a different story” story about Earth’s geologic history

A team of scientists including Carnegie’s Michael Ackerson and Bjørn Mysen revealed that granites from Yosemite National Park contain minerals that crystallized at much lower temperatures than previously thought possible. This finding upends scientific understanding of how granites form and what they can teach us about our planet’s geologic history. Their work is published in Nature. …

Yosemite granite “tells a different story” story about Earth’s geologic history Read More »

A dozen new moons of Jupiter discovered, including one “oddball”

Twelve new moons orbiting Jupiter have been found—11 “normal” outer moons, and one that they’re calling an “oddball.”  This brings Jupiter’s total number of known moons to a whopping 79—the most of any planet in our Solar System. A team led by Carnegie’s Scott S. Sheppard first spotted the moons in the spring of 2017 while they …

A dozen new moons of Jupiter discovered, including one “oddball” Read More »

Foam could offer greener option for petroleum drillers

Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, provides critical energy for society, but also uses large amounts of fresh water while producing corresponding amounts of wastewater. Water-based foams, which use about 90 percent less water than fracking fluids, provide an alternative, but the mechanism for foam-driven fracture in such drilling is not well understood. Now, Princeton researchers led …

Foam could offer greener option for petroleum drillers Read More »